First piece of video available from [ówt krì]'s debut concert in Helsinki, 27th of June 2014.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mvW7HQzVD94

The Use ’Aunt Joanne’s Metaphysics’ official video

'Aunt Joanne's Metaphysics' is taken from 'What's The Use?' (ALRN052) available at Bandcamp:
http://alrealonmusique.bandcamp.com/album/whats-the-use-alrn052
http://theusemusic.bandcamp.com/
 

The Use - “Aunt Joanne’s Metaphysics” from Candace Thompson on Vimeo.

Video: Directed by Candace Thompson with David Smith, Model: Sarah Riegle
Music: “Aunt Joanne’s Metaphysics” from the album What’s The Use?
Available here: theusemusic.bandcamp.com
Label: Alrealon Musique, Pas Musique curated series.
Mixed by Billy Perez at iiwii studios, mastering by Tarekith at Inner Portal Studio,
Additional percussion by Jay Van
Special thanks to Jay Pluck and John Pizza
Find out more about Euler’s Disks at eulersdisk.com

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http://www.emfmusic.com

Hey folks,

The Experi-MENTAL Festival 6 official website is now live. Please send this to everyone! Much thanks to lots of work by Philippe Gerber from Alrealon Musique. Let me know if you have any questions.
http://emfmusic.com/

The Facebook link is still here:
https://www.facebook.com/events/486195561524674

All the best and have a wonderful weekend!

Robert

[ówt krì] was interviewed for the #33 edition of the Ambient Online Podcast.

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The Inner Life of God / The Father, The Son and The Holy Spirit (Preview) from JOHN 3:16 on Vimeo.

Short preview of the upcoming video of ‘The Inner Life of God’ by JOHN 3:16

'The Inner Life of God' is taken from Visions of The Hereafter - Visions of Heaven, Hell and Purgatory (ALRN033), by John 3:16

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Thank you @S1gnsOfL1fe for being the 666th follower on Twitter! #666 #evil#BeastMode

Thank you @S1gnsOfL1fe for being the 666th follower on Twitter! #666 #evil#BeastMode

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Fat Kneel interviewed by Chris Gilmore (FluiD, mNIPK)
1. Could you please introduce yourself?
I go by the name of Fat Kneel, from the District of Columbia. I’m a beat-maker/turntablist.
2. You’ve taken to calling yourself the “Roger Corman of hip-hop”, could you elaborate on that?
Aside from being a huge fan of a slew of his films, and B-movies in general, I love the idea crafting something amazing with very limited resources and making what I think sounds dope, not what’s conventional. That gritty, DIY aesthetic is something that has always appealed to me. There’s a certain honesty to it. 
3. Are you planning any live shows in support of your new EP?
So far, just a couple of open mics and beat showcases in the DC area. 
4. How has the reception to the EP been?
Amazing so far. Everyone has been extremely supportive, it has really kept me going. When I first started making beats, I was doing it primarily for my own consumption. The thought that other people would enjoy them is still something I’m struggling to wrap my mind around. 
5. Who has inspired you most musically?
MF Doom, Boards of Canada, El-P, Clams Casino have probably had the biggest influence on me musically. I love production with an unapologetically gritty feel. I love the crackle and pop of dusty vinyl; the hiss and wobble of a sample taken from an old sci-fi movie on VHS. That sort of vibe. 
6. Was there any type of plan when you were putting together The Future Suk’t EP?
Yeah, definitely. The Future Suk’t is an imaginary soundtrack of a dystopian sci-fi film that was never made. Each track is like a different scene with different characters, each with its own unique mood or vibe. When I’m working on a beat, I realize that I’m nearing completion when I start envisioning a movie sequence being played out to it.
7. The artwork is really interesting, who did it and what is the concept behind it?
The artwork was my own design, made from a photograph I took few years back. It’s actually a shot from one of the floors of the row-house I live in. It’s basically Project Mayhem from Fight Club.
8. Are you still using the SP-505?
Nah, I sold my 505 a while back. I later heard that is has developed this sort-of cult following, which is pretty cool.
9. What is the ‘Mass Appeal Rhythm Roulette’ web series?
This music site, Mass Appeal has this web series called Rhythm Roulette where they take producers to record stores and have them select 3 vinyl records completely at random. The producer then has to craft a beat using samples from the 3 records. It’s an incredibly cool concept and it’s always entertaining. The El-P and Jake One episodes are two of my favorites.
10. Is there a “golden era” of hip-hop for you?
Personally, the late 90s-early 2000s, back when Rawkus Records had the most badass label roster in the industry. It just seemed like everyone during that period was doing crazy stuff in music and everyone had a unique sound. It wasn’t as easy to describe artists as “sounding like so-and-so” as it is today. That was back when I first went off to school; can’t tell you how many times I blew my money for groceries and school books on CDs.
11. Now that EP is out, what’s next for you?
I’m currently working on a few collaborations with other artists. It’s been really fun so far and I’m really enjoying what I’m doing. I hope people can hear it in my music.


THANK YOU FAT KNEEL!


The Future Suk’t EP (ALRN050) by Fat Kneel is available at Bandcamp
<a href=”http://alrealonmusique.bandcamp.com/album/the-future-sukt-ep-alrn050” data-mce-href=”http://alrealonmusique.bandcamp.com/album/the-future-sukt-ep-alrn050”>The Future Suk’t EP (ALRN050) by Fat Kneel</a>

Fat Kneel interviewed by Chris Gilmore (FluiD, mNIPK)

1. Could you please introduce yourself?

I go by the name of Fat Kneel, from the District of Columbia. I’m a beat-maker/turntablist.

2. You’ve taken to calling yourself the “Roger Corman of hip-hop”, could you elaborate on that?

Aside from being a huge fan of a slew of his films, and B-movies in general, I love the idea crafting something amazing with very limited resources and making what I think sounds dope, not what’s conventional. That gritty, DIY aesthetic is something that has always appealed to me. There’s a certain honesty to it. 

3. Are you planning any live shows in support of your new EP?

So far, just a couple of open mics and beat showcases in the DC area. 

4. How has the reception to the EP been?

Amazing so far. Everyone has been extremely supportive, it has really kept me going. When I first started making beats, I was doing it primarily for my own consumption. The thought that other people would enjoy them is still something I’m struggling to wrap my mind around. 

5. Who has inspired you most musically?

MF Doom, Boards of Canada, El-P, Clams Casino have probably had the biggest influence on me musically. I love production with an unapologetically gritty feel. I love the crackle and pop of dusty vinyl; the hiss and wobble of a sample taken from an old sci-fi movie on VHS. That sort of vibe. 

6. Was there any type of plan when you were putting together The Future Suk’t EP?

Yeah, definitely. The Future Suk’t is an imaginary soundtrack of a dystopian sci-fi film that was never made. Each track is like a different scene with different characters, each with its own unique mood or vibe. When I’m working on a beat, I realize that I’m nearing completion when I start envisioning a movie sequence being played out to it.

7. The artwork is really interesting, who did it and what is the concept behind it?

The artwork was my own design, made from a photograph I took few years back. It’s actually a shot from one of the floors of the row-house I live in. It’s basically Project Mayhem from Fight Club.

8. Are you still using the SP-505?

Nah, I sold my 505 a while back. I later heard that is has developed this sort-of cult following, which is pretty cool.

9. What is the ‘Mass Appeal Rhythm Roulette’ web series?

This music site, Mass Appeal has this web series called Rhythm Roulette where they take producers to record stores and have them select 3 vinyl records completely at random. The producer then has to craft a beat using samples from the 3 records. It’s an incredibly cool concept and it’s always entertaining. The El-P and Jake One episodes are two of my favorites.

10. Is there a “golden era” of hip-hop for you?

Personally, the late 90s-early 2000s, back when Rawkus Records had the most badass label roster in the industry. It just seemed like everyone during that period was doing crazy stuff in music and everyone had a unique sound. It wasn’t as easy to describe artists as “sounding like so-and-so” as it is today. That was back when I first went off to school; can’t tell you how many times I blew my money for groceries and school books on CDs.

11. Now that EP is out, what’s next for you?

I’m currently working on a few collaborations with other artists. It’s been really fun so far and I’m really enjoying what I’m doing. I hope people can hear it in my music.



THANK YOU FAT KNEEL!



The Future Suk’t EP (ALRN050) by Fat Kneel is available at Bandcamp

Cultural Forgeries (ALRN058) by Rapoon - available soon (Limited Edition Digipack CD+Digital)
http://alrealonmusique.bandcamp.com/album/cultural-forgeries-alrn058

Cultural Forgeries (ALRN058) by Rapoon - available soon (Limited Edition Digipack CD+Digital)

http://alrealonmusique.bandcamp.com/album/cultural-forgeries-alrn058